Monthly Archives: August 2014

ASHA Board of Directors Excludes Evaluation of CAA

By a unanimous decision, the Board of Directors accepted in January of 2014 the recommendations of the Ad Hoc Committee on Committee, Board, and Council Structure Review to exclude evaluation of “the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) and CAA Affiliated Subcommittees.”

The recommendation was made… “on the basis of a conference call with Paul Rao, 2012 Past President and Barbara Moore, 2012 Vice President for Planning and a follow-up electronic communication with Arlene Pietranton, Chief Executive Officer…”

Curriculum and program advancements in schools cannot be achieved until the Board of Directors holds the CAA accountable for improving graduate education for school SLPs. The CAA is responsible for standards. and the BOD is responsible for the CAA.

The Bylaws indicate accountability:

“4.9.1. The Board of Directors may establish and dissolve standing committees, boards, councils, ad hoc committees, working groups, and other entities necessary to conduct the Association’s business, and designate and change their charges and determine their size, member qualifications, and terms.”

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ASHA BOD Should Evaluate CAA Policies and Procedures

We urge the ASHA Board of Directors to evaluate the administrative policies and procedures of CAA in consideration of school programs and curriculum development necessary for modern school practice.

Something doesn’t compute!

The BOD represents the only legal authority of ASHA. Specifically, the Bylaws say:

“4.1.2. The Board of Directors is the single governing body of the Association and shall actively promote the objectives of the Association, operating in accordance with and administering and implementing the programs and policies established by these Bylaws and by the Board of Directors. Members of the Board of Directors are elected to serve by and are accountable to the members of the Association.”

The ASHA mission statement includes “setting standards” and “fostering excellence in professional practice…”  The CAA is not mentioned.

The Board has full authority to address issues facing CAA:

“4.9.1. The Board of Directors may establish and dissolve standing committees, boards, councils, ad hoc committees, working groups, and other entities necessary to conduct the Association’s business, and designate and change their charges and determine their size, member qualifications, and terms.”

In 2013 the Board voted to approve two CAA members appropriately. It also voted to waive evaluation of CAA, exercising its authority to do so. If it can waive evaluation, it can initiate evaluation.

The ASHA Board of Directors must ignore claims by the CAA to stand alone, as an independent authority. It is responsible to the voting and paying membership via the Board, and half the membership works in schools.

The “autonomy” claim simply does not hold water: In the Bylaws 8.2 this claim is not affirmed:

“The Association, by action of the Board of Directors, shall establish and maintain a program of academic accreditation. The Association shall establish the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA), which shall define the standards for the accreditation of graduate education programs and apply those standards in the accreditation of such programs…”

 

 

Department of EducationDSC00166

The U. S. Department of Education recognizes ASHA for accrediting speech-language pathology and audiology:
“AMERICAN SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING ASSOCIATION– 
Council on Academic Accreditation: Candidate Status”

CAA is the sub-agency of ASHA. The Department of Education recognizes ASHA as the accrediting agency, and the BOD is responsible for ASHA.

CAA is not self-supporting. ASHA members pay for space, personnel and funds to support CAA operations. Such facts do not support the claim of autonomy.

The U. S. Department of Education is presently accepting ASHA’s application for renewal.

“American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology 
1967/2010/F2015”

ASHA Board Shifts Mission for Improving Accreditation

We are happy to see the Board of Directors has shifted the ASHA mission to include accreditation and educational preparation. The CAA (Council on Academic Accreditation) should be drawn out of its silo to address school speech-language pathology curriculum development.

The new mission includes “setting standards” and “fostering excellence in professional practice, and advocating for members and those they serve.”