ASHA Philosophy of Curriculum Turned Upside Down. 5

Shredding the Traditional curriculum

The strand model later incorporated into accreditation standards created a mish-mash of curriculum content statements diluting academic standards and confusing graduates as to what “courses” are accepted within scope of practice. SLPs write in to ASHA raising questions about what is and what is not a work duty; e.g., reading. School SLPs want ASHA to limit scope of practice for workload considerations. At the same time the public relations department highlights countless courses that “appear” to be duty courses. This is more a revenue approach than an academic approach, one leading to the sale of continuing education credits. It is in the non-profit’s best interest to push SLPs to take on as many different disabilities as possible. SLPs see the ethical problems with this business approach. SLPs complain they shouldn’t have to accept assignments outside scope of practice. Thus one sees the long-term consequence of Dr. Spahr’s business model of SLP practice, creating an unfortunate conflict of interest between academic and business viewpoints.

USA

Knowledge-Skill

We see  how the knowledge-skills paradigm supports the business approach in marketing SLP services to employers and consumers. Statements of knowledge can be connected to hundreds of skills in a manner approaching arbitrary practices. A a cognitively impaired (knowledge) child (autistic) who repeats words can receive a fluency treatment (skill). An academic approach seeks to avoid the faulty connection imagined. Yet the special education supervisor might be pleased the SLP is trying to correct word repetitions.

Academics believe the SLP must have a course in stuttering and autism to understand the underlying causes of the symptoms considered. One cannot just connect bits of knowledge and bits of skill and have a valid treatment plan.

Why Does My Child With Autism Repeat Words and Phrases?
autism.about.com/od/childrenandautism/f/echolalia.htm‎

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