“Suspensions Hit Minorities, Special-ed Students Hardest”

href=”https://schoolspeechpathology.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/frontlewis3232_620x465.jpg”>Library of Congress, via CBS News: "Child labor photos from 1911 The child labor photos Lewis Hine took in the early 1900s were meant to shock Americans into reforming child labor laws. Decades later, many of these photos are getting a fresh look, thanks to one man's efforts to link the subjects to their living relatives. This photo taken in Winchendon, Mass., in Sept. 1911, shows Mamie Laberge at her workstation. She is under the legal work age. 

Caption information from "The Library of Congress." Library of Congress, via CBS News: “Child labor photos from 1911
The child labor photos Lewis Hine took in the early 1900s were meant to shock Americans into reforming child labor laws. Decades later, many of these photos are getting a fresh look, thanks to one man’s efforts to link the subjects to their living relatives. This photo taken in Winchendon, Mass., in Sept. 1911, shows Mamie Laberge at her workstation. She is under the legal work age. 

Caption information from “The Library of Congress.”[/caption]

“Suspensions hit minorities, special-ed students hardest” is the headline for an article authored by Linda Shaw, Seattle Times education reporter.

No surprise here:

“A new analysis of discipline data in nine Washington school districts shows that black and Native American students, as well as those in special education, are suspended and expelled at higher rates than the average student.”

The U. S. Department of Education is looking into this.

What is important is that the problem is beyond special education personnel and policies. School cultures seek to exclude struggling children from educational opportunity and minority children are more likely to struggle.

Past Findings

As featured on NPR, the Texas example is clear-cut: “Texas Schools Study: Most Kids Have Been Suspended, CLAUDIO SANCHEZ, July 19, 2011

http://www.npr.org/2011/07/19/138495061/report-details-texas-school-disciplinary-policies

http://seattletimes.com/html/education/2023423257_schooldisciplinexml.html

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