3. SLP Collaboration

We argue that SLP collaboration — indeed, special education collaboration — is best practice and not a fad. It appears to be a fad because it is hardly in use. For eligibility management, it is one strategy for reducing over-identification of at-risk children and reducing caseload management problems.

Consider the work of SLP Claudia Dunaway on innovative service delivery (Dunaway, 2007). One program was a collaborative school articulation clinic. She reports:

“The Articulation Resource Center sponsors the speech improvement class, which is a response to intervention (RTI) approach to working with kids with articulation differences. We use the latest methodologies, we collect data, and we’re able to provide short-term effective intervention. Most of our kids are in and out with corrected articulation errors within 20 hours….”

Additionally, the Center serves a larger purpose, to reduce the number of children placed in special education:

“We’ve significantly reduced the number of kids on IEPs and saved the district a lot of money and we’ve done it in a way that benefits students. That’s always our first goal—our first concern—what can we do to serve our students.”

The Center also supports early dismissal. Prior cases had been receiving SLP services for 3 years.

Library of Congress, via CBS News: "Child labor photos from 1911 The child labor photos Lewis Hine took in the early 1900s were meant to shock Americans into reforming child labor laws. Decades later, many of these photos are getting a fresh look, thanks to one man's efforts to link the subjects to their living relatives. This photo taken in Winchendon, Mass., in Sept. 1911, shows Mamie Laberge at her workstation. She is under the legal work age. 

Caption information from "The Library of Congress."

Library of Congress, via CBS News: “Child labor photos from 1911
The child labor photos Lewis Hine took in the early 1900s were meant to shock Americans into reforming child labor laws. Decades later, many of these photos are getting a fresh look, thanks to one man’s efforts to link the subjects to their living relatives. This photo taken in Winchendon, Mass., in Sept. 1911, shows Mamie Laberge at her workstation. She is under the legal work age. 

Caption information from “The Library of Congress.”

“We discovered that we could shorten that time—we were able to get it down to under 20 hours. I think 75 percent of the kids are done within 15 hours.” Hence, caseload size was controlled through quick dismissals.

Collaboration is a method for Strategic Eligibility Management and educational speech-language pathology. It is best practice and a good practice.

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