Misidentification Old Problem

Why historically have so many at-risk or hard-to-teach children been placed in special education? The problem is an old one, as pointed out by the Emstac organization:

“A panel convened by The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) emphasized in its report, Placing Children in Special Education: A Strategy for Equity (Heller et al., 1982), the necessity for “improvements in special education referral, assessment, placement procedures and instructional practices” (p.112). The NAS panel regarded disproportionality as harmful when it results from inadequate instruction in general education programs, inappropriate assessment practices, or ineffective special education programs.”

Subsequent reports to Congress have repeatedly pinpointed the same problems, and relatively little progress has been made in factually reducing over-identification of at-risk children for special education. Twenty-seven years later the same issues face us — “improvements in special education referral, assessment, placement procedures and instructional practices” (cf. RTI Adrift).

Why so little process? Is it we lack procedures or will?

“Administrators should take a close look at school practices that may reduce disproportionality, including prereferral interventions, family involvement, instructional practices in general education, personnel preparation, and professional development, to improve student outcomes and reduce overrepresentation.”

Advertisements
Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: